Look Book 2018

Three must have heirloom sarees for a wedding Trousseau!!

Thing passed down from generation to generation have some sort of magic laced on them as if there are hidden messages and secrets in them that the future generations are yet to decipher. An old belonging that was owned by someone you probably would have never have met and nor will but can still feel their touch and fragrance through these small things that have been a witness for so long!

Yes, we are talking about family heirlooms. They are like small time machines, that  on physical contact, can teleport you to a time, when that entity was young and was a beloved possession of someone from the family tree. In India, there is a tradition among women to pass down richly weaved sarees down the family line. It is like passing down the family crest and keeping the culture intact.

Sarees like Jamavar, Tanchoi and Baluchari are some of the most common but expensive heirlooms to be found!

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Jamavar silk Saree

What is Jamavar? Jamavar is a luxurious transformation of a silk saree with distribution of complex design on the silk or Pashmina. The patterns that play peek-a-boo in a Jamavar saree are usually made of valuable fibre and are quiet heavy and of immense worth! “Jama” means robe and “war/var” means chest or metaphorically body. These sarees are best made out of Kashmir’s Pashmina silk and the hide and seek designs are made of brocaded threads. Made of rich and shiny silk, these are vintage sarees and are a prized possession!

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Baluchari Silk Saree

What is Baluchari? The most unique and traditional sarees are the Baluchari silk ones! These sarees originated in Bengal and Bangladesh and depict various mythological scenes all over their border and pallu. The field of the saree is generally spread with small floral designs. Balucharis can be broadly categorized based on threads used in weaving the patterns:

  • Baluchari (Resham) 
  • Baluchari (Meenakari) 
  • Swarnachari (Baluchari in gold)

They are weaved with rich gold thread and meenakari work and are a class apart! No doubt ….the best family heirloom saree that one can ever possess!

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Tanchoi Silk Saree

What is Tanchoi Silk? Tanchoi is a complex and elaborate weaving technique as it involves two or more different coloured silk threads on a single silk fabric. Originally Tanchoi art was brought to India by ‘Choi’ brothers from China. Therefore this technique came to be known as Tanchoi. The weavers from Benaras started incorporating Zari work into Tanchoi sarees. The Benaras Tanchoi have several different variety:

  • Satin Tanchoi
  • Satin zari Tanchoi
  • Mushabbar
  • Atlas or Gilt

No wonder, they are passed down the family tree!

Women should invest their money on such luscious sarees because just like diamonds, these sarees are forever. They are absolutely worth investing money on. Such invaluable sarees can be handed over from generation to generation and can travel through the test of time. It is known that a woman’s heart is an ocean of secrets. Women often associate their thoughts and dreams with certain things, which they believe can keep them safe and untouched.

Such a thing of great value are often handed over by them to another woman, whom they trust the most, in the hope that their unfulfilled dreams might be fulfilled by the upcoming generation. Its like trusting that one person with your untold dreams. That’s the value of a family heirloom. It’s not just a thing of monetary worth, but also a huge mix of emotions and sentiments and hence, owning one, to hand over in the future, is definitely worth it.

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